Defending My Career Philosophy

8 Jul

I believe in employment happiness. I believe in doing work that is purposeful and fulfilling, work that incites satisfaction regularly. I also believe that if the process of obtaining that dream job takes a few unplanned steps or means enduring some not-so-fulfilling roles, so be it. If the promise of a meaningful career is accompanied by some tiring, stressful, developmental years as a young professional feeling out the real world, so be it. If the intimidation and expense of applying for and attending graduate school requires some extra months of thought and deliberation, so be it. This is my career philosophy.

As long as the steps you take are thought out and strategic moves toward the larger picture, there’s no issue. The relationships developed along the way help to build a strong, close-knit network of professionals willing to help as the future unfolds. The knowledge learned, the skills acquired , the experience earned during a “stepping stone job” are all leading toward a bigger, better goal. A dream. An accomplishment. This is my career philosophy.

So when someone recently told me to “wake the hell up” I began questioning my philosophy on life, especially as it pertains to my career path.

“Stop taking on all these little side projects [blogging, PR assistance, community volunteering] you’re doing for free and focus on moving yourself forward,” one said.

Am I not making moves? Is my plan not working? Am I wasting my time? This uncomfortable uneasiness lingered and left a strong feeling of self-doubt and stress. Its not like I’m working full-time in a field I love. Wait actually, I am.

There is this traditional view on how things are supposed to happen. We continue to burden our creative tendencies, our exploratory needs by forcing a timeline on life with these condescending little check boxes that, if remain unchecked, reflect failure. #FailingAtLife

…Why?

When so many others scrapped the book of life, the traditional methods toward obtaining The American Dream: Steve Jobs, Walt Disney, Mark Zuckerberg. These people are successful. They are revered. They are influential.

That my personal career philosophy, which perhaps doesn’t fit into the plans suggested to me, is coming under so much scrutiny appalls me. My side projects make me happy. They give me purpose. They’ve broadened my network from simply the tristate area to a nationwide network of bloggers, business owners, thought leaders and just all-around cool people.

SO HERE’S MY DEFENSE:

I believe in employment happiness. I believe in doing work that is purposeful and fulfilling, work that incites satisfaction regularly. I also believe that if the process of obtaining that dream job takes a few unplanned steps or means enduring some not-so-fulfilling roles, so be it. If the promise of a meaningful career is accompanied by some tiring, stressful, developmental years as a young professional feeling out the real world, so be it. If the intimidation and expense of applying for and attending graduate school requires some extra months of thought and deliberation, so be it.

This is my career philosophy.

As long as the steps you take are thought out and strategic moves toward the larger picture, there’s no issue. The relationships developed along the way help to build a strong, close-knit network of professionals willing to help as the future unfolds. The knowledge learned, the skills acquired , the experience earned during a “stepping stone job” are all leading toward a bigger, better goal. A dream. An accomplishment.

This is still my career philosophy. 

And if you don’t like it, you can remain chained to your check boxes, because that’s not how I roll.

 

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10 Responses to “Defending My Career Philosophy”

  1. Tina July 9, 2014 at 1:53 pm #

    Well said. You’re the one on the path, and if you want to take a while to get there, there’s not a thing wrong with that!

    • Honey July 10, 2014 at 12:56 pm #

      Thanks, Tina! Sometimes time is all you need.

  2. Half and Half July 9, 2014 at 4:37 pm #

    I say this everytime to my mother when she asks me why I do things and not get paid for it. I guess sanity is cheap where she comes from!

    • Honey July 10, 2014 at 12:57 pm #

      Parents just don’t understand (Will Smith, get it?) Anyway, yes it really is difficult to explain this to folks who just don’t see that things are so different now. It is a new playing field.

  3. blainecindy July 10, 2014 at 8:28 am #

    I think that you need to follow your own path, be true to your own self, and if this is the way you want to go, then do it. Don’t listen to others.

    • Honey July 10, 2014 at 12:58 pm #

      Thanks, blainecindy. I appreciate your kind words.

  4. Jen July 10, 2014 at 9:09 am #

    Absolutely, if you can work and enjoy what you are doing, then why not try and do both?

    • Honey July 10, 2014 at 12:59 pm #

      Precisely, Jen. I’m a multitasker, always have been.

  5. inNateJames July 10, 2014 at 12:01 pm #

    The word career is almost obsolete at this point. I think the times call for us to redefine the job world and hopefully construct a system that is more mutually beneficial to employees and employers. Starting with the idea that people should love their jobs, like you write, should be the New World Order. Great post!

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